CampusBryn_Mawr
SemesterSpring_2014
Registration IDENGLB216001
Course TitleRe-creating Our World
Credit1.00
DepartmentEnglish
InstructorDalke,Anne F.
Time And DaysMW 2:40pm-4:00pm
Room LocationEHII
Lab Sections
Additional Course InfoClass Number: 1579
To this shared project, the discipline of English literary studies will contribute an awareness of the limits and possibilities of representation, asking what is foregrounded, what backgrounded or omitted, in each verbal, visual, aural or tactile re-presentation of the world. Asking, too, what might be imagined that has not yet been experienced, “Re-creating Our World” invites students both to create their own multi-modal representations of the spaces they occupy, and to re-create, in some way, the space that is Bryn Mawr. This course offers a shared exploration of imaginative images and texts, with a global reach and in a range of genres (photography, film, poetry, as well as multiple narratives, in forms that will vary from satire to science fiction, from apocalypse to utopia). On field trips to local sites, we will also study “representations” of the world in the form of various "shaped spaces," including The Center for Environmental Transformation in Camden, the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge at Tinicum, John James Audubon's house @ Mill Grove, Wissahickon Valley Park, Chanticleer (a pleasure garden in Wayne), and the Laurel Hill Cemetery.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC), Critical Interpretation (CI);, ; Haverford: Humanities (HU)
Limited to 360 students only. This Eco-Literacy 360° cluster
considers our participation in the environment from the perspectives
of economics, education, and various forms of literary and visual
expression. Our goal is to develop a vocabulary for thinking, feeling
and talking about the ways in which the places we live affect each of
us, and how each of us affects the places we live. We are particularly
interested in how the resources of economics, education and creative
expression, as well as the intersections among these disciplines,
might help us understand and convey our understandings in insightful
and inciting ways to others, to engage in what radical literacy
activist Paulo Friere calls “re-writing” or transforming the world.
Application due November 6th: https://brynmawr.wufoo.com/forms/360a-preregistration-ecoliteracy/
Miscellaneous LinksDepartmental Homepage
Book Prices



CampusBryn_Mawr
SemesterSpring_2014
Registration IDENGLB216001
Course TitleRe-creating Our World
Credit1.00
DepartmentEnvironmental Studies
InstructorDalke,Anne F.
Time And DaysMW 2:40pm-4:00pm
Room LocationEHII
Lab Sections
Additional Course InfoClass Number: 1579
To this shared project, the discipline of English literary studies will contribute an awareness of the limits and possibilities of representation, asking what is foregrounded, what backgrounded or omitted, in each verbal, visual, aural or tactile re-presentation of the world. Asking, too, what might be imagined that has not yet been experienced, “Re-creating Our World” invites students both to create their own multi-modal representations of the spaces they occupy, and to re-create, in some way, the space that is Bryn Mawr. This course offers a shared exploration of imaginative images and texts, with a global reach and in a range of genres (photography, film, poetry, as well as multiple narratives, in forms that will vary from satire to science fiction, from apocalypse to utopia). On field trips to local sites, we will also study “representations” of the world in the form of various "shaped spaces," including The Center for Environmental Transformation in Camden, the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge at Tinicum, John James Audubon's house @ Mill Grove, Wissahickon Valley Park, Chanticleer (a pleasure garden in Wayne), and the Laurel Hill Cemetery.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC), Critical Interpretation (CI);, ; Haverford: Humanities (HU)
Limited to 360 students only. This Eco-Literacy 360° cluster
considers our participation in the environment from the perspectives
of economics, education, and various forms of literary and visual
expression. Our goal is to develop a vocabulary for thinking, feeling
and talking about the ways in which the places we live affect each of
us, and how each of us affects the places we live. We are particularly
interested in how the resources of economics, education and creative
expression, as well as the intersections among these disciplines,
might help us understand and convey our understandings in insightful
and inciting ways to others, to engage in what radical literacy
activist Paulo Friere calls “re-writing” or transforming the world.
Application due November 6th: https://brynmawr.wufoo.com/forms/360a-preregistration-ecoliteracy/
Miscellaneous LinksDepartmental Homepage
Book Prices



CampusBryn_Mawr
SemesterSpring_2014
Registration IDENGLB216001
Course TitleRe-creating Our World
Credit1.00
DepartmentGender and Sexuality Studies
InstructorDalke,Anne F.
Time And DaysMW 2:40pm-4:00pm
Room LocationEHII
Lab Sections
Additional Course InfoClass Number: 1579
To this shared project, the discipline of English literary studies will contribute an awareness of the limits and possibilities of representation, asking what is foregrounded, what backgrounded or omitted, in each verbal, visual, aural or tactile re-presentation of the world. Asking, too, what might be imagined that has not yet been experienced, “Re-creating Our World” invites students both to create their own multi-modal representations of the spaces they occupy, and to re-create, in some way, the space that is Bryn Mawr. This course offers a shared exploration of imaginative images and texts, with a global reach and in a range of genres (photography, film, poetry, as well as multiple narratives, in forms that will vary from satire to science fiction, from apocalypse to utopia). On field trips to local sites, we will also study “representations” of the world in the form of various "shaped spaces," including The Center for Environmental Transformation in Camden, the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge at Tinicum, John James Audubon's house @ Mill Grove, Wissahickon Valley Park, Chanticleer (a pleasure garden in Wayne), and the Laurel Hill Cemetery.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC), Critical Interpretation (CI);, ; Haverford: Humanities (HU)
Limited to 360 students only. This Eco-Literacy 360° cluster
considers our participation in the environment from the perspectives
of economics, education, and various forms of literary and visual
expression. Our goal is to develop a vocabulary for thinking, feeling
and talking about the ways in which the places we live affect each of
us, and how each of us affects the places we live. We are particularly
interested in how the resources of economics, education and creative
expression, as well as the intersections among these disciplines,
might help us understand and convey our understandings in insightful
and inciting ways to others, to engage in what radical literacy
activist Paulo Friere calls “re-writing” or transforming the world.
Application due November 6th: https://brynmawr.wufoo.com/forms/360a-preregistration-ecoliteracy/
Miscellaneous LinksDepartmental Homepage
Book Prices




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